Uncategorized, visual art

combien du temp

unnamed

 

The Journal Gallery exhibits “Infinity Mirror,” a solo exhibition by Michael Stipe, organized by Clarissa Dalrymple.

“Infinity Mirror” stems from the contents of Stipe’s recent publication, Volume One, and further expands on his use of photo-based practices to explore the 1970’s as a formative decade through its cultural impact on his coming of age, and subsequently, the manner in which its influence informed the creative work he went on to create, both privately and as a public figure.

The exhibition presents a selection of photographic material, ranging from images made by Stipe, to historical ephemera he continues to collect and alter, or use as source material that informs his own use of the camera. These found and made materials remain in an ongoing and ever-shifting relationship within Stipe’s practice, blurring understandings of time and authorship.

In the gallery, four distinct bodies of work are positioned as facets of the piece Infinity Mirror, 2018. Situated in the center of the space, this work functions as a lexicon of sorts. It is comprised of ten identical brass shelving units by the iconic 1970s designer Milo Baughman, which Stipe has aligned edge to edge, creating an object of unusual volume and density, appearing as a multiplying projection of itself. The sculpture displays an eclectic collection of both personal and historical ephemera, including keepsakes and materials that Stipe encountered firsthand as a teenager.

 

Advertisements
Standard
Uncategorized, visual art

Hot Topic

“so many rules and so much opinion / so much bullshit but we won’t give in” — Julie Ruin

narcissusgardenbyyayoikusama_venicebiennale_1966_installationandportrait

Starting tomorrow, MoMA PS1 presents Yayoi Kusama’s (Japan, b. 1929) site-specific installation of Narcissus Garden (1966–present) as the third iteration of Rockaway!, a free public art festival presented with Rockaway Artists Alliance, Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Conservancy, National Park Service, and Bloomberg Philanthropies. Narcissus Garden will be on view from July 1 through September 3, 2018 at the Gateway National Recreation Area at Fort Tilden.

Comprised of 1,500 mirrored stainless steel spheres, Narcissus Garden will be on view in a former train garage from the time when Fort Tilden was an active U.S. military base. The mirrored metal surfaces will reflect the industrial surroundings of the now-abandoned building, drawing attention to Fort Tilden’s history as well as the devastating damage inflicted on many buildings in the area by Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

Rockaway! 2018 is presented by MoMA PS1 with Rockaway Artists Alliance, Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Conservancy, National Park Service, and Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Standard
trend, Uncategorized, visual art

we’re all going to hell

what if jesus were just a guy visiting the met museum, checked his cross at the coat check

7. DalmaticofPiusIX,1845-61.jpg

what would he make of all this?

15. HBUnicornTapestriesGalleryView.jpg

would he call out:

9. TiaraofPiusIX,1854.jpg

not you proud Anna Wintour, not sweet misunderstood Donatella Versace, not the museum guests, not cherished Madonna, nor desired Rihanna, nor the docents, nor poor forsaken Lee McQueen himself … understand what Power is … understand what Glory is … understand at all. 26. EveningDress,Valentino,Spring2014.jpg

Standard
Uncategorized, visual art

Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction

Starr Figura
Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints The Museum of Modern Art

&

Sarah Hermanson Meister
Curator, Department of Photography The Museum of Modern Art

212.1977
Lee Krasner (American, 1908–1984). Gaea. 1966. Oil on canvas, 69″ x 10′ 5 1/2″ (175.3 x 318.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Kay Sage Tanguy Fund, 1977 © 2017 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Making Space spotlights the stunning but still under-recognized achievements of women artists between the end of World War II and the onset of the Feminist movement in the late 1960s. Drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection and featuring a diversity of media, this exhibition explores the remarkable range of abstract styles that took hold internationally during these decades, a time when women artists attempted to make space for themselves in a largely male-dominated art world.

261.1983

Eva Hesse (American, born Germany. 1936–1970). Untitled. 1966. Enamel paint and string over papier-mâché with elastic cord, Overall approximately 33 1/2 x 26 x 2 1/2″ (85 x 65.9 x 6.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Ruth Vollmer Bequest, 1983. © 2017 Estate of Eva Hesse.  Galerie Hauser & Wirth, Zurich

 

Eccentric Abstraction

In the 1960s, women artists were among the key pioneers of a new direction for abstraction that emphasized unusual materials and processes. This new tendency was first identified by the critic and art historian Lucy Lippard, who organized the 1966 exhibition Eccentric Abstraction for New York’s Fischbach Gallery. Two of the artists in this section, Louise Bourgeois and Eva Hesse (American, born Germany. 1936–1970), were included in that exhibition.

 

646.1997

Yayoi Kusama (Japanese, born 1929). No. F. 1959. Oil on canvas, 41 1/2 x 52″ (105.4 x 132.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Sid R. Bass Fund, 1997. © 2017 Yayoi Kusama

 

398.1963

Lee Bontecou (American, born 1931). Untitled. 1961. Welded steel, canvas, black fabric, rawhide, copper wire, and soot, 6′ 8 1/4″ x 7′ 5″ x 34 3/4″ (203.6 x 226 x 88 cm).The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Kay Sage Tanguy Fund, 1963. © 2017 Lee Bontecou

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 Street, New York, NY 10019

April 15–August 13, 2017
Floor three, Exhibition Galleries

Standard
Uncategorized, visual art

Amour Fou

mal1.jpg

Marion Cotillard plays an unapologetic afflicted misfit in 1950’s France, seeking a cure in the swiss alps.  A tragic romance ensues with a shut-in lieutenant (Louis Garrel).  From the bizarre trip inside the delusional mind of a lunatic, it becomes evident: her suffering can’t be helped.

From the Land of the Moon / Mal de pierres
Nicole Garcia, France/Belgium/Canada, 2016, 116m
French and Spanish with English subtitles

 

mal2

Standard
Uncategorized, visual art

Rose Hartman, Incomparable by name

Rose was there. Somewhere between Bill Cunningham and Weegee she planted herself, sure and stout.

bianca-jagger-at-studio-54-1977-by-rose-hartman

Bianca Jagger at Studio 54 1977 by Rose Hartman

Not afraid to speak her mind, Rose is unfazed by anyone’s power, she rather takes it in.

15036445_10154646772351192_2129744915136459245_n

Anna Wintour photographed by Rose Hartman

Just when things appear dull, Rose draws you near her and she tells you something sensational in a hushed whisper.

14725633_10154539677186192_5640931613453849701_n

Models Backstage at Donna Karan photographed by Rose Hartman

Rose captures the moment without disrupting it, because she is an integral part of it.

13693017_10154296303761192_1488289033023860445_o

From INCOMPARABLE COUPLES photo by Rose Hartman

The vibrance, joy, opulence, and electricity in the images are the current that runs through her and her lens.

warhol-and-lou-reed-by-rose-hartman

Andy Warhol and Lou Reed photographed by Rose Hartman. 

Rose was everywhere I wished I could’ve been.  All the places I just heard or read about or saw in magazines.

diana-ross-and-halston-by-rose-hartman

Rose lives the dream and in photos it seems sweet and beautiful.  What’s most impressive is she has so much to show for being there, the stunning work she did.

otis-and-rose-social

Otis and Rose

The fact that she and her work endures gives restorative energy to those who hoped but were beaten down by adversity, shunned by the precarious uncertainty of an artist’s life, and plagued with self-doubt. Here is a woman who can show you how to grab life by the lens.

Experience a closer look at Rose and her work in the documentary The Incomparable Rose Hartman which premieres tomorrow at DOC NYC.

http://www.docnyc.net/film/the-incomparable-rose-hartman/

 

Standard